Overview

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Single tickets: Onsale August 20.

“Figaro, Figaro!” This Rossini classic features one of the most well-known pieces of music in history. This prequel to The Marriage of Figaro tells the story of how Count Almaviva wins the hand of his beloved Rosina with the help of his clever barber, Figaro. Full of laughter and beautiful music, see why The Barber of Seville has delighted audiences for more than two centuries.

The Barber of Seville (Il barbiere di Siviglia)
Opera in two acts
Music by Gioachino Rossini
Libretto by Cesare Sterbini, based on Pierre Beaumarchais’s French comedy
Premiere: Rome 1816

This Production
Directed by Christopher Mattaliano
Sets designed by Allen Moyer
Sung in Italian with English supertitle translations projected above the stage
Running time: About 2 1/2 hours

Artists

Alek Shrader

Count Almaviva

Shrader, with his matinee-idol good looks, had the most challenging music to sing and he negotiated the long, florid vocal lines with disarming ease, agility and a sweet, open sound.
-Chicago Tribune

The brilliant lyric tenor Alek Shrader continues to impress audiences with the “luxury of his phrasing, the clarity of his diction and the sensitivity and expressiveness of his characterizations”. Mr. Shrader makes several debuts in the 2016-2017 season, including at Wigmore Hall in a recital with pianist Roger Vignoles, with Opera de Oviedo in Spain performing Ferrando in Così fan tutte, and with the Minnesota Opera as Endimione in a production of Vicente Martín y Soler’s Diana’s Garden. He then returns to the Arizona Opera for performances of Don Ramiro in La Cenerentola and to the Santa Fe Opera to sing Oronte in Handel’s Alcina. Future projects include returns to the San Francisco Opera, the Santa Fe Opera, the Seattle Opera and Opera de Oviedo.

Alek Shrader

Count Almaviva

Daniela Mack

Rosina

Daniela Mack delivers a fiery Rosina in a punchy, vibrant mezzo that’s deeply satisfying.
—The Times 

Mezzo-soprano Daniela Mack has been acclaimed for her “caramel timbre, flickering vibrato, and crisp articulation” (Opernwelt) as she “hurls fast notes like a Teresa Berganza or a Frederica von Stade” (San Francisco Chronicle). 

Recently Daniela created the role of Elizabeth Cree in the world premiere of Kevin Puts and Mark Campbell’s Elizabeth Cree at Opera Philadelphia and returned for Carmen. She returned to the Washington National Opera as Bradamante in Alcina, and debuted at the Seattle Opera as Berlioz’s Béatrice in Béatrice et Bénédict.

Daniela Mack

Rosina

Andrew Shore

Dr. Bartolo

Andrew Shore is acknowledged as one of the most outstanding singer/actors currently working on the lyric stage.

Andrew has worked for all the major British houses.  In North America he has worked for the Metropolitan Opera, New York, San Francisco Opera, Paris Opera, San Diego Opera, Dallas Opera, Vancouver, Santa Fe Opera, Ottawa and the Lyric Opera of Chicago. Also New Israeli Opera, the Opéra Comique in Paris, the Liceu in Barcelona, the Netherlands Opera, Komische Oper Berlin, Hamburg, Lyon, Nantes, Montpelier, and Copenhagen.

Andrew Shore

Dr. Bartolo

Lucas Meachem

Figaro

Grammy-Award winner Lucas Meachem is considered one of the greatest baritones in the world today. Hailed by critics as “vocally faultless and a natural actor” (Classical Chicago Review) with “a clear baritone whose fragments can pierce the soul” (Forum Opera), and “a rock star of opera” (Opera Pulse), his 2017-18 season brings both new and signature repertoire to theaters across the United States and Europe.

Following his sensational return to the Metropolitan Opera as Marcello in La Bohème alongside Sonya Yoncheva and Michael Fabiano with a “winning, smooth baritone [that] was at once refined and robust” (Parterre), Meachem made his house debut at the Houston Grand Opera as the title role of Il Barbiere di Siviglia where “[he] gave the audience evidence of why this has become his signature role” (Houstonia).

Lucas Meachem

Figaro

Wayne Tigges

Don Basilio

Wayne Tigges presented Olin Blitch through an effective amalgam of vocal velvet, sex appeal and vainglorious smarm, all cut with a surprisingly moving splash of vulnerability in his final scene.
-Opera News

Lauded by the Chicago Sun-Times for his “rich, dark tone and beautiful legato,” Wayne Tigges returned to the title role in Der fliegende Holländer with Atlanta Opera in the 2017-18 season. He also sings Alfio in Cavalleria rusticana and Tonio in Pagliacci with New Orleans Opera, the title role in Gianni Schicchi and further performances of Tonio in Pagliacci with Utah Opera, Ping in Turandot with Tulsa Opera, and creates the role of Sgt. Aaron Marcum in the world premiere of Huang Ruo and David Henry Hwang’s An American Soldier in a return to Opera Theatre of Saint Louis. Last season included performances of the title role in Der fliegende Holländer with Austin Opera, Owen Hart in Dead Man Walking and Howie Albert in Blanchard’s Champion with Washington National Opera, all four Villains in Les contes d’Hoffmann with L.A. Opera and Hawaii Opera Theater, and Roy Cohn in Angels in America with New York City Opera.

Wayne Tigges

Don Basilio

Cheyanne Coss

Berta

Soprano Cheyanne Coss is a recent graduate of New England Conservatory, where she performed the roles of Iphigénie in Gluck’s Iphigénie en Tauride and Sandrina in Mozart’s La Finta Giardiniera. This summer, she will make her San Francisco debut in the role of Aminta in Mozart’s Il Re Pastore with the Merola Opera Program. Cheyanne has also performed with Chautauqua Opera, Charleston Symphony Orchestra, and Opera Theatre of Saint Louis. Cheyanne has won several competitions, including First Place in the William C. Byrd Young Artist Competition, the David Daniels Young Artist Competition and second place in the FAVA Grand Concours Competition. Next season, Cheyanne will make her debut as Pamina in The Magic Flute with Opera Grand Rapids and Toledo Opera. As the new Michigan Opera Theatre Studio soprano, she will perform Berta in The Barber of Seville, Dew Fairy in Hansel and Gretel and Paquette in Candide. Cheyanne hails from Eaton Rapids, Mich. and is a proud alumna of Oakland University.

Cheyanne Coss

Berta

Harry Greenleaf

Fiorello

Wixom, Michigan native Harry Greenleaf is Michigan Opera Theatre Studio’s resident baritone. He made his debut with Michigan Opera Theatre in 2016 in the role of Top in The Tender Land. His credits with MOT also include Le Bret in Cyrano, Jack Wallace in The Girl of the Golden West and Morales in Carmen. He has been a Studio Artist with the Wolf Tap Opera Company, an Apprentice Artist with Des Moines Metro Opera and a Young Artist with the Glimmerglass Festival. He holds a Master of Music degree from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and is an alumnus of the Michigan State University College of Music. Last season, Harry performed with MOT as Marullo in Rigoletto, Sciarrone in Tosca and the roles of Leo Stein and Man Ray in Ricky Ian Gordon’s 27.

Harry Greenleaf

Fiorello

Christopher Allen

Conductor

The recipient of the 2017 Sir Georg Solti Conducting Award, Christopher Allen has been featured in Opera News magazine as “one of the fastest-rising podium stars in North America.” His conducting career was launched by the Bruno Walter Conducting Award and Memorial Career Grant and has been fostered by Plácido Domingo and James Conlon, who brought him to Los Angeles Opera as an Associate Conductor.

In the 2017-18 season, Mo. Allen returned to Opera Theatre of Saint Louis to conduct a new production of La traviata directed by acclaimed soprano Patricia Racette, and lead the North Carolina premiere of Jennifer Higdon’s Cold Mountain at North Carolina Opera. He debuted at The Atlanta Opera leading La fille du régiment, featuring Stephanie Blythe, and returned to the University of North Carolina School of the Arts to helm Impressions de Pelléas, before conducting Il barbiere di Siviglia at the Aspen Music Festival. Mo. Allen serves as music director of the Bel Canto Trio’s 70th anniversary tour, featuring today’s internationally acclaimed rising opera stars in the program originally toured by Mario Lanza, George London, and Frances Yeend.

Christopher Allen

Conductor

Christopher Mattaliano

Director

Mr. Mattaliano has directed for the Metropolitan Opera, New York City Opera, San Francisco Opera, Washington Opera, the Canadian Opera Company, L’Opera de Montreal, Opera Theatre of St. Louis, Minnesota Opera, Dallas Opera, and Central City Opera, among many others.  His work has also been enjoyed internationally at L’Opera de Nice and the Norwegian National Opera.

He has directed world premieres of Hugo Weisgall’s Esther for the New York City Opera, jazz composer Fred Ho’s Journey Beyond the West for the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Peter Westergaard’s The Tempest for the Opera Festival of New Jersey, and the American premiere of Veniamin Fleishman’s Rothschild’s Violin at the Juilliard Opera Center.

His passion for stage direction has extended to teaching at the Juilliard School, the Metropolitan Opera Young Artist Development Program, Manhattan School of Music, Yale University, Princeton University, Mannes College of Music, and the New National Theater of Japan.  In 1996 his essay on auditioning (“The Dreaded Audition”) was published by Opera America.

Christopher Mattaliano

Director

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Synopsis

Seville, 1800s

ACT I
Count Almaviva, posing as a student, “Lindoro,” serenades the beautiful Rosina from outside her window. Rosina is the ward of Dr. Bartolo, who intends to marry her and get her dowry. Rosina, under Dr. Bartolo’s watchful eye, does not appear at the window. Disappointed at her non-appearance, the Count engages the help of Figaro, Seville’s barber and general factotum. Figaro, faced with the prospect of a monetary reward and besting Dr. Bartolo, is quick to offer his assistance. The barber devises a clever plan: The Count will disguise himself as a drunken soldier billeted at the doctor’s house, thereby gaining access to the object of his desire. Meanwhile, Rosina, touched by the serenading voice, resolves to outwit Dr. Bartolo.

In a military uniform and behaving the drunk, Almaviva thwarts all of the Bartolo’s attempts to dismiss him, while simultaneously revealing to Rosina his “true” identity as Lindoro. The doctor summons the police to get rid of the soldier. Discreetly conveying his true status to the officers, the Count is not arrested, to the astonishment of the others.

ACT II
Count Almaviva returns to Dr. Bartolo’s residence, this time posing as a music teacher, “Don Alonso.” He claims to be substituting for Don Basilo, who is ill, and insists on giving Rosina a music lesson. Figaro distracts Bartolo by shaving him. When Don Basilo enters, obviously not sick, the group convinces the professor that he actually does have scarlet fever. Finally alone in their lesson, the Count and Rosina make plans to elope. Dr. Bartolo shoos Figaro and Almaviva out, as he, himself, makes plans to marry Rosina that very evening. Bartolo convinces Rosina that Lindoro is Count Almaviva’s flunky.

Almaviva and Figaro return again, now disguised in cloaks. They must convince Rosina that the Count’s intentions are honorable, even though she knows him only as “Lindoro.” Dr. Bartolo, however, has removed their ladder as he left to make his own wedding arrangements.

When Don Basilio arrives with a notary—sent to officiate Dr. Bartolo’s marriage to Rosina—Count Almaviva bribes them into officiating his ceremony instead. Rosina and Almaviva have just finished their vows when Dr. Bartolo rushes in with the police. The plot is explained and, learning that the Count will allow him to keep Rosina’s dowry, Dr. Bartolo is appeased.

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